Hearing Loss ClaimsHow much compensation for hearing loss

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Miners’ Hearing Loss

Many workers who’ve worked in mines and in what’s know as ‘the tunneling industry’ in the UK have gone to develop serious industrial disesases including vibration white finger, black lung, hearing loss and severe tinnitus.

For many miners who’ve worked in coal mines in Britain many of these illness are curable, however for a majority of miners, the symptoms of occupational diseases such as hearing loss and tinnitus will be with them for life.

Making a miners hearing loss claim

Unfortunately because of the working conditions in British coal mines, miners continue to make more claims for hearing loss compensation than any other profession.

Claims brought by former British coal mine workers have formed the biggest personal injury compensation scheme in British legal history and its not surprising, with so many industrial diseases all related to the mining industry.

If you have worked for a coal mine or worked in the tunneling industry then our Mercury Legal Online claims team are here to help.  We have helped thousands of people just like you, whether you’re a current or former mine worker or a family member we can help you to claim compensation for noise induced hearing loss.

Getting compensation for British coal miners

We have helped thousands of miners make a ‘no win no fee’ occupational deafness claim for compensation.

From the 1st April 2013 when you contact us you will not be asked to pay any money whatsoever up front and even if your claim is unsuccessful through no fault of your own you will never be asked to pay anything to anyone. We take the jargon out of the claims process and well make the process and simple and straight forward as possible for you.

Our trained coal miners team will talk to you about what is involved in making a hearing loss claim for compensation and will guide you through every step of the legal process including explaining what no win no fee means.

We will be able to answer any questions you may have and even come to your house to help you with all of the form-filling. Just fill in our compensation claim form and one of our expert advisers will be in touch or you if you prefer you can talk directly to someone now by calling our 24hr Mercury Legal helpline on 0800 122 3130, or request a call back – your claim will be dealt with immediately either way.

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Claiming For Hearing Loss


No Obligation Help

If you are unsure if you have a claim for your hearing loss, then call our team for free, no obligation advice on making a claim. They will ask you some simple questions about your exposure and will be able to tell you if you have a claim or not. Call 24/7 0800 122 3130.

Tea Party to raise money for Tinnitus

Rock band the Inspiral Carpets recently held a tea party to raise money for the British Tinnitus Association following the death of their drummer who had suffered from tinnitus for almost twenty years before taking his own life as a result of the stress caused by it. The band who were part of the ‘Madchester’ scene in the 1990s, held the party at The Smiths room in the legendary Salford Lads’ Club and aimed to raise £500 for the BTA, and while final figures are still being added up, it appears the event was far more successful than they’d hoped, raising at least half of the amount before the event even started. Craig Gill had joined the band at the age of fourteen and was described by his band mates as the ‘beating heart’ of the group. Tragically he took his own life at his home in Saddleworth last year after suffering from the debilitating effects of the condition for twenty years. Tinnitus is often described as a ringing in the ears, although those affected may hear other noises such as whistling, hissing or humming. It is most often caused by prolonged or frequent exposure to loud noise and so musicians, particularly those in the rock and pop genres are in a particularly high-risk profession. There are not any medicines which have been shown to effectively treat tinnitus, but that does not mean that it cannot be treated. There are medicines available that can treat the underlying cause; such as an ear infection, but in most cases the effects of tinnitus can be minimised by making changes to your... read more

Look after your ears at festivals

If like many thousands of others you are planning to go and enjoy some live music this summer, be careful that you don’t unwittingly endanger your hearing. If you have ever returned from a loud festival or concert and found that your ears are still ringing then you will have a basic understanding of what Tinnitus is; but imagine that the ringing never goes away. According to the charity Action on Hearing Loss, the average nightclub has a sound level of over 100 decibels, whereas the average for a rock concert is 110 decibels. Bearing in mind that exposure to noise levels above 85db is damaging to the ear, it doesn’t take an expert to work out that spending a few days exposed to very loud noise is potentially very dangerous to your hearing. While we understand that the volume of the music is a crucial part of the atmosphere of a concert or festival, there are a variety of ways we can minimise the risk of hearing damage while still enjoying the experience. Action on Hearing Loss has five top tips: Don’t stand too near the speakers for a prolonged amount of time Take breaks between acts Make sure you keep your body hydrated to increase blood circulation and keep your body and ears healthy Wear ear plugs Make sure your children wear ear defenders. Don’t ear plugs take the fun away? In a nutshell; no. Modern ear plugs are designed to reduce the harmful sound frequencies without reducing the quality of the sound, so you can enjoy the music without the risk of hearing loss. While many... read more

The “Hum in the Drum”

One of this year’s most critically acclaimed movies has been the romantic musical disguised as a car-chase thriller: Baby Driver. While audiences have marvelled at the range and standard of the film’s eclectic and marvellous soundtrack, it hides a far deeper and darker reasoning for the range of music played. One of the main stars of the film is a getaway driver who suffers from tinnitus as a result of a childhood accident. The soundtrack to the film is based on the salvational soundtrack to his life that he creates in order to drown out the constant distraction of the debilitating condition. Tinnitus can manifest itself in a variety of noises, but is often described as a ringing, whistling or buzzing within the ear when there is no other source of sound. It can develop as a result of damage to the tiny hairs that act as sensory receptors within the ears. This damage is most often caused by exposure to loud noise; either over a long period of time, or exposure to extremely loud noise over a shorter period of time. According to Dr LaGuinn Sherlock, a clinical audiologist currently researching the effects of tinnitus on concentration, tinnitus can be described using the analogy of a dark room: “Picture a dark room, if you add one candle to the room you’ll notice it straight away. However if you light a candle in a room already full of light, it is less noticeable.” In essence, tinnitus is a sense of noise that fills a missing gap, even when there is nothing to cause it. It is important to remember... read more